Keynotes

[Keynote 1][Keynote 2]

Dr. Jonathan Grudin, Microsoft Research Redmond, Washington, USA

Title: Between a Rock and a Hard Place: Perspectives on Collaboration Technology.
Date: Tuesday 13th - 09:15am - 10:30am

Abstract

Software to support collaboration is an extraordinary challenge to research, develop, and use because it is positioned between an immovable object and an irresistible force. The immovable object is human nature, which includes social behaviors that evolved over the millions of years our ancestors lived in groups. Advances in semi-conductor technology – the irresistible force -- have followed an unparalleled exponential curve that makes forecasting difficult or impossible. I will describe several perspectives on this dilemma that have come to seem particularly useful or important to me in the two decades since I began working in this area as a system and application developer.

Biography

Grudin Jonathan Grudin is a principal researcher in the Adaptive Systems and Interaction group at Microsoft Research. He was previously Professor of Information and Computer Science at the University of California, Irvine, in the Computers, Organizations, Policy and Society research group. He worked as a software developer at Wang Laboratories before and after getting a Ph.D. in Cognitive Psychology with Don Norman at UCSD. He has also worked at the consortium MCC in Austin and the MRC Applied Psychology Unit in Cambridge, and taught at Aarhus, Keio and Oslo Universities. He has a BA in Mathematics-Physics from Reed College, an MS in Mathematics from Purdue, and a Ph.D. in Cognitive Psychology from UCSD, advised by Donald Norman. He edited ACM Transactions on Computer-Human Interaction for six years and is currently Associate Editor for Human Computer Interaction for ACM Computing Surveys. In 2003, he was the twentieth person inducted into the "CHI Academy" of ACM SIGCHI (Special Interest Group for Computer-Human Interaction). Jonathan Grudin's research in recent years has focused on studies of technology adoption and use, and on the history of human-computer interaction (with articles in the most recent issues of IEEE Annals of the History of Computing and ACM's Interactions).

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Dr. Wendy Kellogg, IBM T.J. Watson Research Center, USA

Title: Perspectives on Social Computing
Date: Wednesday, 14th - 09:15am - 10:30am

Abstract

Social computing has emerged as a broad area of research in HCI and CSCW, encompassing systems that mediate social information across collectivities such as teams, communities, organizations, cohorts, populations, and markets. Such systems are likely to support and make visible social attributes such as identity, reputation, trust, accountability, presence, social roles, expertise, knowledge, and ownership. Social computing is transforming organizations and societies by creating a pervasive technical infrastructure that includes people, organizations, their relationships and activities as fundamental system components, enabling identity, behavior, social relationships, and experience to be used as resources. In this talk, I argue for a broad definition of social computing, selectively review emerging applications, and discuss current research within and beyond IBM that is driving and is driven by the emerging vision of social computing.

Biography

Wendy Wendy A. Kellogg is one of the founders of the field of social computing, forming the first research group focusing on Social Computing in 1998: the Social Computing Group at IBM's T. J. Watson Research Center. Topics addressed by the group have included social translucence (a conceptual framework pioneered by Erickson and Kellogg), computer-mediated communication, social proxies, the design of social software, knowledge management, awareness systems, enhanced audio conferencing, collaboration and human productivity in high performance computing, social and task visualizations, and most recently, serious games, virtual worlds for business use, and "Enterprise 2.0."

Kellogg's work in human-computer interaction (HCI) over more than two decades has spanned areas including theory, evaluation methods, design, and development. She holds a Ph.D. in Cognitive Psychology from the University of Oregon. She is author and editor of publications in the fields of HCI and CSCW, and currently serves on the editorial board of ACM’s Transactions on Computer-Human Interaction. Wendy chaired CHI 2005 Technical Papers, DIS 2000’s Technical Program, and the CSCW 2000 and CHI’94 conferences. She chaired Workshops for CHI 2004 and has served numerous times as an associate chair for CHI, CSCW, ECSCW, and DIS. She served on the National Academy of Science’s Computer Science and Telecommunications Board and in 2002 was elected ACM Fellow "for contributions to social computing and human-computer interaction."

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